Student Discounts That Can Save You Thousands

Going to university is typically quite expensive. Today’s costs are high enough that many post-secondary students are unable to complete their schooling without incurring some student debt. Fortunately, there are many student discounts that do not require more than a student card, student number, or a timetable.

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Re-Evaluating University Degrees

Re-Evaluating University Degrees

An acceptance letter to a university undergraduate degree program is generally seen as the most successful conclusion to high school. I’m not trying to say that getting accepted to university is insignificant or that it isn’t a sign of success. What I’m suggesting is that it isn’t necessarily a given that every undergraduate degree is a smart investment in one’s future.

With any investment, we’re open that over time, we will see an increase in value. For a university degree to be a successful investment, graduates want to see a boost in earning potential greater than the cost of the degree, lost wages (income you could have earned instead of being in school), and value for the time spent in class and studying.

Graduates want to see a boost in earning potential greater than the cost of the degree, lost wages and value for the time spent in class and studying.

 

How much does it cost to go to University

According to an April 2018 article by Maclean’s, the average Canadian student spends $9,300 per year if they are living at home.  Students who move away for their undergraduate degree tend to spend more than double, spending closer to $20,000 per year.

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Review: The RESP Book

The RESP Book: The Simple Guide to Registered Education Savings Plans for Canadians – Mike Holman

For parents wanting to save for their children’s education, there may be no better option than the Registered Education Savings Plan.  I’ve found that there is a TON of information on the internet about RESPs, but I’ve found very little of it to be useful.  The CRA’s website has the rules, but tells you little about how it would work for you.  And the rest that I’ve found on the internet are from financial institutions that are trying to sell you on their RESP products.  Naturally, I’m wary of these.

Who is this book for?

If you are looking for a guide on the RESP, with explanations that are simple enough for ordinary Canadians to understand, this is the book.  If you’re looking for unbiased information on RESP from someone who is not trying to sell you a product, this is the book.

Mike Holman filled-in all the gaps for me in my research.  He describes how the program works, the best way to use it and things to be careful of.  On specific strength of the book, is the number of ‘what-if’ scenarios that Holam presents.  I found that he did an effective job of presenting enough scenarios that every Canadian should be able to pick up the book and figure out how to best make the RESP work for them and their child.  Holman does a good job of explaining all the intricacies of the RESP.

The RESP Book: The Simple Guide to Registered Education Savings Plans for Canadians.  The title says it all.  It’s a book about RESPs.  Mike Holman has made the RESP program simple.  And, it’s a really effective guide.  

For parents (or really any family members) thinking about saving for their children’s education, The RESP Book is an excellent investment.